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Wednesday, May 29, 2013

Featured Website | Existential-Humanistic NorthWest

Logo for Existential-Humanistic NorthWest non-profit org for healing professionals
Existential-Humanistic Announces New Website/Online
Resources for Healing Professionals
We are pleased to share this link to the new website for Existential-Humanistic NorthWest. Envisioned by Portland psychotherapist, Bob Edelstein (former EHI Board Member and current EHI Advisor), as a result of his passion for the existential-humanistic perspective. Newly launched, www.ehnorthwest.org is the online home of EHNW, a Pacific Northwest organization of healing professionals who aim to embody the primary existential-humanistic values found in the EHNW Vision:
Existential-Humanistic NorthWest is here to impact the world through existential-humanistic values of authenticity, integrity, responsibility, inclusion, and awe.
Find out more about EHNW and get to know the 12 members of the Existential-Humanistic NorthWest Organization Development Committee on the About page of EHNW here. Also check out the EHNW Upcoming Events/Activities, visit the events page here . EHNW invites you to stay up to date with EHNW news and events byjoining the EHNW mailing list here.

Related Posts:

Bob Edelstein Existential-Humanistic Psychotherapy Interview Series Pt 5 (w/ links to Parts 1-4)

Recently Bob Edelstein writes on "We are No-thing"

Thursday, May 23, 2013

Registration Open | EHI 7th Annual Conference

"Beyond Anxiety and Worry: Finding Strength and Meaning in Everyday Living."

EHI has opened registration for the upcoming 7th Annual Existential-Humanistic Institute Conference. The 2013 Conference theme "Beyond Anxiety and Worry: Finding Strength and Meaning in Everyday Living" will be explored in the two-day event taking place at the AgeSong Institute in San Francisco.

Online and off-line registration options are available here at the EHI Upcoming Events page along with more information.

To receive email updates regarding EHI and EHI's 2013 Annual Conference join our mailing list:


Sign up for EHI email updates




Related Posts:

EHI Annual Nov Conference info and Call for Proposals



Wednesday, May 22, 2013

Featured Interview | Dr Kirk Schneider with Thom Hartmann on The Big Picture

Why Extremism is on the rise...Kirk J. Schneider, Ph.D., The Polarized Mind, joins Thom Hartmann on The Big Picture

Dr Kirk Schneider talks with Thom Hartmann about why extremism is on the rise. We often talk about right-wing extremists trying to take over the Republican Party - but in reality - there are extremists in all branches of our society. What leads someone to resort to extremism - and how can we combat polarization of the mind?

View the interview:



Book Release and Signing

Join us May 22, 2013 6:00pm - 8:00pm at Saybrook University Campus for Book Release and Signing with Kirk Schneider, PhD, Polarized Mind, at Saybrook University. Jointly hosted by Saybrook University and University Professors Press.

Related Posts:

Featured Book | The Polarized Mind: Why It's Killing Us and What We Can Do About It by Kirk Schneider, PhD

Monday, May 20, 2013

Featured Webinar Event | The Self Under Siege: A New Model of Differentiation

Bio pic of Dr. Dr Lisa Firestone Author and Clinical Psychologist - presenter of webinar "The Self Under Siege: A New Model of Differentiation" Presented by: Dr. Lisa Firestone, author and clinical psychologist

Webinar | The Self Under Siege: A New Model of Differentiation
Tuesday, May 21, 2013 - 4pm to 5:30pm PST
Register and view program at any time (it will be recorded)
3 CE Credits- $35 includes recording, PowerPoint and two chapters.

Differentiation refers to the struggle people face in striving to develop a sense of themselves as autonomous individuals. A fundamental question to have clients consider is: are they living based on the things that really light them up and give meaning to their lives, or are they living based on prescriptions from their past? Are they living according their own values and principles or according to the values and standards of others or society? A person's identity is continually affected by interpersonal experiences that are either favorable or damaging to the development of his or her personality. In order for people to fulfill their destiny, they must free themselves from destructive influences. When someone is able to develop and sustain aspects of their unique identity, they're able to live truly individualistic lives. This Webinar teaches an innovative approach to differentiation, a four-step process developed by Robert Firestone, PhD :
  1. Breaking with internalized thought processes, critical attitudes toward self & others.
  2. Altering the negative personality traits in oneself that represent an incorporation of aversive traits of one’s parents
  3. Identifying/relinquishing patterns of defense formed as an adaptation to painful events in childhood.
  4. Developing one’s own values, ideals & beliefs. 
When taking this challenge of differentiation, clients have their best chance of living a goal-directed life & developing themselves to their fullest.

Learn more or register here -
PyschAlive Events | The Self Under Siege: a New Model of Differentiation

A recording will be sent to all paid registrants. 
CEs are offered to professionals through PsychoEducational Resources, Inc. (PER). 
For beginner, intermediate, and advanced level practitioners. 
Get CE details at http://www.psychalive.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/CE-Statement.pdf.  
CE Certificates are mailed from (PER) 3-4 weeks after Webinar completion. 
For more CE info call PER at 800-892-9249, email support@per-ce.net.
For special needs - jina@glendon.org or 805-681-0415.
No cancellations/ refunds.

Thursday, May 16, 2013

Consensus Smiles | Conversations with Ed

Dr. Sally Gelardin shares some of her perspective on the backstory of Conversations with Ed - Waiting for Forgetfulness

Nader, Ed and Patrick discuss
"Conversations with Ed -
Waiting for Forgetfulness
I first met Ed in early 2010, at a book event in Marin, where Ed was presenting with Nader Shabahangi, Founder and CEO of AgeSong Elder and Assisted Living Communities, and Patrick Fox, Co-Director, Institute for Health & Aging, UCSF.

Conversations with Ed, Waiting for Forgetfulness: Why Are We So Afraid of Alzheimer's Disease? is a book about Ed, who had been diagnosed with early Alzheimer's in 2008. I was inspired by the book, the conversation, and especially by the dignity that Ed both demonstrated and inspired from the audience and his co-presenters. As a result, I chose to volunteer at one of AgeSong’s elder communities in the Bay area, where I met other individuals diagnosed with Alzheimer's, who were also treated respectfully and provided with a variety of enrichment activities.

Origins of the Book

In the following interview with Bob Levitt, Ed’s long-time friend, I learned how Ed and Nader met and how Nader came to co-author the book with Ed and Patrick. Book cover Conversations With Ed by by Ed Voris, Nader Shabahangi and Patrick Fox
Bob recalled: "I was really just a messenger, carrying an idea, a concept, that had been developed in concert with Ed and Elizabeth Bugental. It was Elizabeth who encouraged us to go to her friend Nader and develop a relationship of mutual benefit between Ed and AgeSong. I have known Ed for over 20 years. We met in the early '90s. I was a director on the board of the Bolinas Community Land Trust (BCLT) and completely ignorant in the realm of affordable housing projects. Ed was an affordable housing project manager, serving non-profits. BCLT’s board's hiring committee interviewed all the applicants for that job and selected Ed.

Dealing with HUD was (and still is) a rigorous, tedious process. Ed made the process both clear and somewhat fun. He had that good sense of humor and even disposition to manage a tricky and difficult business. Unlike other managers of such projects, who appear to be jovial, but can be manipulative, his humor isn't the manipulative kind that "covers up" or "distracts"....it illuminates."

Ed has a direct, honest approach. His good spirit is genuine. In the non-profit world, people like that are precious. Ed met Nader at AgeSong. Elizabeth Bugental came up with the AgeSong name. She created it from the depths of her experience and perception of aging, from her belief that even the most challenging elements of aging can be seen – and lived – as part of life's full song. I'm sure she says it better in her own words, in her book, AgeSong: Meditations for Our Later Years, one of the seminal connections.

Elizabeth was living with James Bugental, her husband, a legendary psychologist, teacher, and writer. Jim’s pioneering work in existential psychology influenced hundreds of young psychologists, including Nader Shabahangi. Elizabeth was running the drama department at a university in Washington, DC, related to art, psychology, and aging. Then Jim had a stroke, losing all sense that he was James Bugental.

At a presentation, Elizabeth told us that she had hoped that Jim was going to come along that evening, but he had a cold and wasn't feeling so well, so he stayed at home. And when she "talked about" Jim, she talked with an insightful, compassionate empathy that amazed and informed us all. Elizabeth described what it was like to be a partner of a man who had no recollection of his career or their life together. She said that though Jim’s short and long-term memory were gone, his essence was still there – open hearted, sensitive, and present. He did not remember tha the was married to Elizabeth, but his knew that she was very nice and adored him. Because what she put into the relationship was so pure, Jim responded with trust. She was able to impart the merits of being trustworthy with a husband who had no memory of their relationship.

At a party Elizabeth threw for Jim, everyone spoke about what Jim gave to them in their lives. When they finished, Jim said to Elizabeth, “Who? That’s me. I really did that!” When she spoke to us on that one night, she evoked the best kind of tears from many of us. Jim lived to be in his 80s. Elizabeth died about five or six years later. Before she died, I told her that I had a friend, Ed, who was recently diagnosed with Alzheimer's. She was running an AgeSong support group in Marin. She wanted to meet Ed. I introduced her to Ed at lunch in Petaluma. They got along immediately. Elizabeth told Ed to keep breaking new boundaries, to relax, and to get together with Nader. Ed adored her. Shortly thereafter, Ed met with Nader. In 2007, Nader brought Ed together with Patrick and they wrote the book collectively, each bringing his special perspective into the conversation.

Six Years Later

Ed lived independently for many years and has recently moved to AgeSong’s Hayes Valley community in San Francisco, where one can usually find him in the front lobby, watching the world go by and chatting with passersby. His friend Bob had fears about Ed moving to assisted living. Bob was afraid Ed was feeling frustrated about his lack of independence. “He finds life entertaining and stimulating at AgeSong,” Bob noted. He continued: "Ed is at his best when he feels useful, even when it's simply through the elevating quality of his humor.Yesterday, as he struggled with his mind's fluctuating abilities, trying to express what was an important point, getting it started, but losing it, starting it again, losing it again, restarting, losing, restarting, losing.....I tried to help by doing a rehash of what he'd said, a bit of what had led into what he'd said, then his key words repeated, and then, as he stared at me with a puzzled look, I added the explanation, 'I just said all that as a rehash for you to consider, to get you re-directed back on track', to which Ed replied, 'Well consider me un-re-directed.' And, once again, our efforts in "keeping continuity" surrendered pleasantly to shared laughter. Ed's humor is a great and continuous, therapeutic gift, to us and himself."

“I like it here,” asserted Ed, “I talk with people who have hours worth of talk. My favorite thing to do is to support people and to make decisions to work our way out of medical problems. I’m working hard at doing little.” At a recent Elders Academy session, Ed said, “We do not spend enough time to figure out who we are and why we are here. When I want to go home, I ask myself, ‘Isn’t home where the heart is?’ ”

[Reprinted from We are AgeSong, May 2013 AgeSong Communities Newsletter posted on AgeSongToday by Dr Sally Gelardin, Enrichment Director at AgeSong Elder & Assisted Living Communities]

Click here to see more Upcoming Events at AgeSongAgeSongToday


Related Posts:

Featured Book | Conversations with Ed – Waiting for Forgetfulness: Why are we so Afraid of Alzheimer’s Disease? by Ed Voris, Nader Shabahangi and Patrick Fox in collaboration with Sharon Mercer

Celebrate Eldership with Elders Academy Press Book Offer

Upcoming May 17 Elders Academy session | Learn about AgeSong’s Elders Academy Certificate Training Program

Tuesday, May 14, 2013

Upcoming Events | Elders Academy: Learning How To Be an Elder at Any Age

Eldership Education for the Second Half of Life
 by Nader Shabahangi, AgeSong Founder and CEO


Elders Academy Sessions to be held at AgeSong San Francisco
AgeSong Elders Academy
Exploring the Definition of
Eldership and Implementing
Personal Eldership Practice
Exploring the definition of eldership, cultural views of eldership in history, eldership in the media, principles and practices of eldership, and implementing a personal eldership practice.


Elders Academy prepares us through education for the second half of life. Whereas societies have found ways to initiate us for the demands of our first half of life through educating us for adulthood and middle adulthood, we are often less prepared to face the second half of life. Here concepts such as retirement and golden years present a limited idea of the potential contained in our second half. Elders Academy re-establishes a truly important role which has been lost in the last few centuries of our industrialization: the role of the elder.

The role of the elder was once the most revered role in our human communities. Eldership as a role and position within a human community started within the tribal traditions. There we find an emphasis on elders as guides and leaders. This indicates that they are experienced and wise and are fit to lead the tribe and teach the young. Elders also resolve social concerns and are expected to make final decisions about the direction communities will take on the many social and individual issues we humans must face.

Today, however, elders are scarcely available to guide and initiate the young and lead our communities to make wise decisions. There is an absence of elders also because the old have not been given the skills and ability to be elders. Moreover, in the last few centuries, the status of the elderly as respected members of their societies has declined. Paralleling this decline has been a diminution of the elders’ role in their respective communities.

We need to train elders if we want to help individuals living in our communities and societies with the important tasks of supporting and guiding the younger in age and experience. For being older does not make an elder. As the history of eldership shows clearly, the qualities attributed to being an elder are quite universal. These traits must be acquired through much training, learning and practice. If we recall, for example, how monks in the various spiritual traditions are initiated over many years into becoming a respected member of their communities, then we have a glimpse of what it will take for an older person to grow into becoming an elder.

Michael Meade emphasizes this point as follows:
“Elders, by tribal imagination, and by more recent definition, are those who have learned from their own lives, those who have extracted a knowledge of themselves and the world from their own lives. We know that a person can age and still be very infantile. This happens if a person doesn’t open and understand the nature of his or her own life and the kind of surprising spirit that inhabits him or her.”

However, where do we learn anymore how to ‘extract knowledge’ from ourselves and the world? What places are left where those of us interested in eldership can learn? Where do we turn to allow our elder within to grow out of us?

Elders Academy is this place within which we can learn to become elders at any age. It is a place where the values that often arrive with age are also seen as an alternative to living a life of meaning and depth. As such, eldership provides a different approach to the way our young and middle adults understand their lives, what they deem to be their values. Our second half of life, rather than being a burden or a period of decline, is understood as the most important part of our life for which the first half was but preparation.

It is our elders, their life experience, skill, knowledge and wisdom that will help usher in a new era of understanding how we can live in harmony with planet and people. And it is our elders that will lead the way to teach us younger in age how we can reach a sustainable way of life, both in terms of matter and spirit.

Upcoming Elders Academy Events:

May 17, 2013 | 4:00 pm - 6:00pm
ELDERS ACADEMY
AgeSong Cafe
602 Hayes Street (corner of Hayes and Laguna)
San Francisco, CA
Topic: Learn about AgeSong’s Elders Academy Certificate Training Program, including Experience in the AgeSong Communities
RSVP: Marlena del Hierro, 415.318.8672 E-Mail: marlena@agesong.com

June 21, 2013 | 4:00 pm - 6:00pm
ELDERS ACADEMY
AgeSong Cafe
602 Hayes Street (corner of Hayes and Laguna)
San Francisco, CA
Session topic: That Old Song and Dance
Featuring Deborah Bloch, PhD, author of That Old Song and Dance
Read more about Deborah Bloch and book here in AgeSongToday article. RSVP: Marlena del Hierro, 415.318.8672 E-Mail: marlena@agesong.com

July 19, 2013 | 4:00 pm - 6:00pm
ELDERS ACADEMY
AgeSong Cafe
602 Hayes Street (corner of Hayes and Laguna)
San Francisco, CA
Session topic: Food for Thought
Presented by Nader Shabahangi
RSVP: Marlena del Hierro, 415.318.8672 E-Mail: marlena@agesong.com

Click here to view more Upcoming Events at AgeSong

[Reprinted with permission from AgeSongToday | January 25, 2013, Elders Academy: Learning How To Be an Elder at Any Age]

Friday, May 10, 2013

Featured Book | Conversations with Ed
Waiting for Forgetfulness: Why are we so Afraid of Alzheimer's Disease

Book Cover for Conversations with Ed - Waiting for Forgetfulness: Why are we so Afraid of Alzheimer's Disease

Conversations with Ed
Waiting for Forgetfulness: Why are we so Afraid of Alzheimer's Disease

by Ed Voris, Nader Shabahangi, and Patrick Fox, in collaboration with Sharon Mercer
Elders Academy Press, 2009

How can we not be afraid of Alzheimer's Disease? How can we not dread aging? by posing these questions we are invited alternate ways of seeing Alzheimer's disease as well as aging. In so doing we do not want to minimize the suffering that people may experience watching a loved one become forgetful. Nor do we want to minimize that becoming forgetful and growing old can be pain processes. Rather, Conversations with Ed wants to create a positive cultural space for people with dementia, for those who accompany them on their journey and for those who fear being afflicted with it.

Read more aboutConversations with Ed and the authors Ed Voris, Nader Shabahangi, and Patrick Fox in this article, "Consensus Smiles" by Dr. Sally Gelardin posted in the "We are AgeSong" May 2013 AgeSong Communities Newsletter.[PDF] In this featured article Dr. Gelardin talks about Conversations With Ed, her meeting Ed Voris, and some backstory about how Ed Voris and Nadar Shabahangi met and how Conversations with Ed evolved. Dr Sally Gelardin is current Enrichment Director at AgeSong Elder & Assisted Living Communities and Editor of AgeSongToday.com

Conversations With Ed and all Elders Academy Press books are currently available 4 for the price of 3 during our Celebrate Eldership!book offer.

This book and all Elders Academy Press books are currently available 4 for the price of 3 during our Celebrate Eldership! book offer.

Buy 3 and get 4th book FREE!

Enter this coupon code: ELDERSHIP2013 during checkout at the Pacific Institute online store or place your order by fax 415-431-1012 or by phone 415-861-3455. Outside of the United States? please phone 001-415-861-3455 ext. 3 or fax 001-415-431-1012 or email info@pacificinstitute.org.

Conversations With Ed, hardcover edition $19.95*, plus shipping & handling

Conversations With Ed, softcover edition $13.95*, plus shipping & handling
*During the Celebrate Eldership! book offer the price is 25% off if purchased with 3 other books from Elders Academy Press!

Related posts:

Featured Book | Deeper into the Soul: Beyond Dementia and Alzheimer's Towards Forgetfulness Care by Nader R Shabahangi, Ph.D. & Bogna Szymkiewicz, Ph.D.

Featured Book: Doing Sixty and Seventy by Gloria Steinem

Featured Book: AgeSong: Meditations for Our Later Years by Elizabeth Bugental, PhD

Featured Book: Encounters of the Real Kind edited by Nader R Shabahangi, PhD

Celebrate Eldership! with Elders Academy Press Book Offer: Buy 3 get 4th book free

[Reprinted with permission from AgeSongToday 04/19/2013 by agesong]

Bob Edelstein Interview Series Pt 5: Existential Humanistic Approach to Couples Therapy

Bob Edelstein Discusses E-H Psychotherapy Part 5 of 5

Join Bob Edelstein as he addresses the "Existential Humanistic Approach to Couples Therapy", in this final part of this E-H Psychotherapy interview series.

In this episode Bob answers the following questions: What is the meaning behind the dichotomy of isolation versus relationship and how can this affect a couple's relationship? In couples therapy of this kind, do you place a heavier stress on assessing the two people as a couple or as individuals? Why? How and why do you as the therapist act as a role model for the couple in therapy? What is meant by an existential theme and what is its importance regarding couples therapy?

Part 5: Existential Humanistic Approach to Couples Therapy (6:45) Askimo TV

Related Posts:

Bob Edelstein Interview Series: Means and Ends of Existential Humanistic Psychotherapy, Part 4 in a 5 part Series on Existential-Humanistic Pyschotherapy.

Bob Edelstein Interview Series: Goals of Existential Humanistic Psychotherapy, Part 3 in a 5 part Series on Existential-Humanistic Pyschotherapy.

Bob Edelstein Interview Series: The Role of the Therapist in Existential Humanistic Psychotherapy, Part 2 in a 5 part Series on Existential-Humanistic Pyschotherapy.

Bob Edelstein Interview Series: Existential-Humanistic Psychotherapy, Part 1 in a 5 part Series on Existential-Humanistic Pyschotherapy.



Bob Edelstein, L.M.F.T., M.F.T., is an Existential-Humanistic psychotherapist based in Portland, Oregon. In addition to being a therapist for over 36 years, he also provides consultation, supervision, and training for professionals, including a one-day workshop entitled Deepen Your Therapeutic Work Using an Existential-Humanistic Perspective. Bob is a founding member of the Existential-Humanistic Northwest Professional Organization and the Association for Humanistic Psychology - Oregon Community. He is a board member of the San Francisco based Existential-Humanistic Institute. Read more from Bob on his blog, Authentic Engagement.

Thursday, May 9, 2013

Monday, May 6, 2013

Notes on Humanistic Psychology Today by Candice Hershman, M.A., LMFT

At APA Division 32: Society for Humanistic Psychology Annual Conference 2013

Highlight at DIV32 2013
 Orah Krug's interview with
  Irv Yalom 

I have come to believe that the success and fruition of every movement is more reliant on a sense of community than initially recognized. However, in a world of increasing technological advancement and globalization, our sense of community has shifted. The positive aspect of this is more rapid connection & sharing of ideas, as well as awareness of our distant & even overseas brothers & sisters. The negative aspect is disembodied contact & loss of the kind of power & agency derived from a close knit, grass-roots community.

Although my love of Existential-Humanistic Psychology is definitely grounded in my genuine belief in the guiding principles (mainly, that the direct experience of people and relationship is more valuable than paradigms of experience and relationships), it is duly my direct experience of the people in the EH Community that has brought vitality to my interests. I somehow imagine that if not for the mentorship and proximal peer learning, Existential Humanistic Psychology would add up to a mere collection of books on my shelf, at best resulting in greater insight. It was the actual people - their energy, vibrancy, integrity, and accessibility that made me want to make a career and life for myself in Existential Humanistic Psychology. Attending the Society for Humanistic Psychology Annual Conference in Santa Barbara amplified that sense of passion for me.

Division 32 of APA, or rather, the Society for Humanistic Psychology has a pretty active Facebook community. I’ve been a member of the Division for about 7 years now, have heard about the conferences, and have made online connections with many of the Division’s members online. For years, I’ve never even met several of the members. I would watch friends of mine get very involved in the online community, and I would recoil a little bit at the thought of investing so much time in online academia.

Regardless, I attended the conference for the first time this year and met not only at least a half dozen people I’d only known online, but dozens of amazing people who I immediately felt strongly akin to. This was the same feeling I had ten years ago when I first became involved in the Learning Community meetings run by Art Warmoth and Pat Hansen at Sonoma State University. This was the warm, truly *person centered* atmosphere that made me feel at home. Most importantly, these were not dry academic personalities that waxed philosophical and wrapped every discussion up with a clinical analysis. These were people who connected beyond the stereotypical, dry and critical anhedonia that has usurped the true value of what it means to heal. Rather, this community is full of juicy, dynamic, expressive, and just damn fun people. These are people who don’t just talk about living. They live.

Additionally, our profession has recently lost many esteemed mentors such as Jim Bugental and Eugene Taylor. One of the most common fears I’ve heard from colleagues is that our breed is dying out. Who will carry the torch? Who will care about existential humanistic psychology? Indeed, we do have contemporary leaders like our own EHI board members, Orah Krug, Kirk Schneider, and Nader Shabahangi. Still, every time there is a loss, the concern about who will fill some very big shoes is amplified. For me, when I gather in a community of such hardy colleagues, my fear is quelled. I know that there are many fresh faces who not only have the brains, but the heart that is necessary to keep a community thriving. For instance, I was greatly impressed with the leadership of Div. 32 President, Dr. Louis Hoffman. He demonstrated the humility, sensitivity, and accessibility that is rare in esteemed positions. Another great example would be Div. 32 Secretary, Dr. Richard Bargdill, and his robust, authentic, and warm personal engagement with not only colleagues, but students just getting involved. This is the attitude that not only creates community involvement, but makes it sustainable. Without the qualities of these two leaders, movements tend to eat themselves alive.

The result of meeting these fabulous folks? The online community is terribly appealing now, being that all of these wonderful people who gathered in Santa Barbara are dispersed all over the country, from Pittsburgh, to Richmond, to Seattle, and so on. And we don’t just talk shop. I just had an online conversation with President Elect Brent Dean Robbins about whether or not a butterscotch flavored ice cream is in existence. He’s a brilliant guy, but I think that conversation has raised my esteem for him exponentially. I like real people who can shoot the breeze about ice cream.

I want to add that many of our own EHI board represented at the conference. Kirk Schneider & Orah Krug presented with Rob Stolorow (Justin Underwood represented David Elkins) on "The Renewal of Humanism in Psychotherapy: Strategies for Transforming Our Field." Kirk’s activist conviction; Orah’s heartfelt representation of the EH-Certification students & their growth as clinicians; Rob’s joining in with the intersubjective, &; Elkin’s representation of evidence based research & its reinforcement of relationship & context factors as key elements of therapeutic efficacy all illustrated different aspects of Humanistic values and the vital role they play in shaping good therapy.

I co-presented along with Louis Hoffman & Michael Moats "The Use of Poetry to Enhance Psychotherapy," covering theories and models of consciousness that support expansive use of language, as well as personal and clinical examples and experiential exercises for the audience. Kirk Schneider again presented Awe, Wisdom and Well-Being: Latest Findings. A grand finale of the conference was Orah Krug’s interview of Irvin Yalom.

In addition to our own board member’s presentations, there were incredible presentations from multicultural perspectives to ethics grounded in love to embodied psychology.

The content was cutting edge, and yet I still want to end on one very central note: It is the steadfast and joyous rhythm of the collective beating heart of Humanistic Psychology that stood out and reminded me of why I have always wanted to be an existential psychotherapist. I don’t just want to talk about living: I want to truly live among others who live and love each other well. I look forward to a continued partnership between EHI and the Society for Humanistic Psychology. Our cutting edge insights may be what bring us validity, but it is our team spirit that will sustain us as more than a group of professionals: we are kin of a movement that continues to grow.


Candice Hershman, M.A., LMFT is a EHI Board Member and current Doctoral student studying at Saybrook Graduate School. Candice currently sees individual and family clients privately in Sausalito, CA specializing in treatment of people with acute/chronic mental health challenges, adults and children who have experienced situational and developmental trauma, and adoption/foster care issues. Candice also provides in-home family therapy to people with small children. In addition, Candice provides mental health consultation to local preschools. Prior to entering the mental health profession, Candice worked for 15 years in Early Childhood Education as both a teacher, director of programs, and county mentor.

Friday, May 3, 2013

Featured Book | The Polarized Mind: Why It's Killing Us and What We Can Do About It by Kirk Schneider, PhD

Book Cover for The Polarized Mind by Kirk Schneider, Phd

The Polarized Mind: Why It's Killing Us and What We Can Do About It
by Kirk Schneider, PhD
University Professors Press, Spring 2013

What do a school shooter, a corporate swindler, and a bullheaded ideologue have in common? They all converge on what Dr. Kirk Schneider terms “the polarized mind.” The polarized mind, which is the fixation on one point of view to the utter exclusion of competing points of view, is killing us—personally, politically, and environmentally. Drawing from the standpoint of existential psychology, this book details the basis for the polarized mind, how it has ravaged leaders and their cultures throughout history (up to and including our own time), and steps we urgently need to take to address the problem. These steps combine contemporary insights with centuries of cross-cultural, awe-inspired wisdom.

Advance Praise for The Polarized Mind

"....one of the great reflections on humanity."
~ Alfried Langle, MD, President of the International Society for Logotherapy and Existential Analysis, Vienna, Austria
“The Polarized Mind is excellent. In my estimation it is a 21st century extension of Rollo May’s Cry for Myth. I mean this as the highest compliment.”
~ Sheldon Solomon, PhD, Social Psychologist, Skidmore College, co-founder of Terror Management Theory and co-author of In the Wake of 9/11
“Enormously important...[The Polarized Mind] will be of great appeal to students, trainees, practitioners, and academics...as well as to educated readers concerned about the perils of human life in the 21st century.”
~ Robert D. Stolorow, PhD, Author, World, Affectivity, Trauma: Heidegger and Post-Cartesian Psychoanalysis, Founding faculty member, Institute of Contemporary Psychoanalysis
"The Polarized Mind is not only very timely, it is also very moving."
~ Sonja Saltman, PhD, co-founder of the Saltman Center for Conflict Resolution at the University of Nevada at Las Vegas (UNLV) Boyd School of Law

The Polarized Mind:Why It's Killing Us and What We Can Do About It
Kirk Schneider, PhD
University Professors Press, Spring 2013
Price: 19.95
ISBN: 978-1-939686-00-8

For more information and to order visit University Professors Press or amazon.com.

Author Kirk J. Schneider, Ph.D., is a leading spokesperson for contemporary existential-humanistic psychology. Dr. Schneider is current editor of the Journal of Humanistic Psychology, vice-president of the Existential-Humanistic Institute (EHI), and adjunct faculty at Saybrook University, the California Institute of Integral Studies, and Teachers College, Columbia University. A Fellow of the American Psychological Association (APA), Dr. Schneider has published over 100 articles and chapters and has authored or edited ten books. Follow Dr. Schneider's blog Awakening to Awe on PyschologyToday.

Bob Edelstein Interview Series Pt. 4: Means and Ends of Existential Humanistic Psychotherapy

Bob Edelstein Discusses E-H Psychotherapy Part 4 of 5

Join Bob Edelstein as he addresses the "Means and Ends of Existential Humanistic Psychotherapy", in this fourth part of his E-H Psychotherapy interview series.

In this episode Bob answers the following questions: What does the theory behind Existential Humanistic Psychotherapy define as the means and the ends? What is the meaning of Sartre's claim that “Existence precedes essence”? In what way can a crisis in a person’s life allow to discover a better meaning of their existence and presence in this world? What happens when there is a conflict in a person between their despised and authentic self and how can existential humanistic therapy help to solve this? What is the value is finding one’s authentic self?

Part 4: Means and Ends of Existential Humanistic Psychotherapy (6:56) Askimo TV

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Bob Edelstein, L.M.F.T., M.F.T., is an Existential-Humanistic psychotherapist based in Portland, Oregon. In addition to being a therapist for over 36 years, he also provides consultation, supervision, and training for professionals, including a one-day workshop entitled Deepen Your Therapeutic Work Using an Existential-Humanistic Perspective. Bob is a founding member of the Existential-Humanistic Northwest Professional Organization and the Association for Humanistic Psychology - Oregon Community. He is a board member of the San Francisco based Existential-Humanistic Institute. Read more from Bob on his blog, Authentic Engagement.

Wednesday, May 1, 2013

EHI Annual Nov Conference info and Call for Proposals

The Existential-Humanistic Institute (EHI) is pleased to announce the 7th Annual EHI Conference, taking place Friday through Saturday, November 15-16, 2013 at AgeSong Institute in San Francisco.

This year’s theme for the conference is “Beyond Anxiety and Worry: Finding Strength and Meaning in Everyday Living.”

Finding the center of strength within ourselves is in the long run the best contribution we can make to our fellow men. ... One person with indigenous inner strength exercises a great calming effect on panic among people around him. This is what our society needs — not new ideas and inventions; important as these are, and not geniuses and supermen, but persons who can be, that is, persons who have a center of strength within themselves.” Existence : A New Dimension in Psychiatry and Psychology (1958).

We welcome proposals that address this theme from a variety of perspectives with preference for experiential workshops that combine a didactics with 'felt experiencing' or other modalities that move us beyond the abstract and talking 'about' things.

The conference is also a training venue for our yearlong certificate program. Upon successful completion, students in the program are awarded a certificate in the Foundations of Existential-Humanistic Practice.

The “certificate track” will offer current and prospective students 12 hours of E-H therapy training, organized around the conference theme and taught by our nationally recognized faculty. (To learn more about the certificate program and the 12 hour certificate track curriculum, visit our website at ehinstitute.org).

You are cordially invited to submit a proposal to present at this conference for plenary sessions, workshops, or posters. Plenary Sessions and Workshops are scheduled 1.5 hours in length..

Deadline for all proposals are due by August 15, 2013. Please submit electronically to admin@pacificinstitute.org.

Please submit the following components with your complete 2-page (500 word max) proposal:.

  1. Presenters’ Contact Info (Name, Mailing Address, Phone Number(s), Email Address)
  2. Description of Session
    • Perspective and/or theoretical framework and/or references to relevant, specific texts, authors, or research, or on-going debates in related fields
    • Goals & Learning Objectives
  3. Time Outline (by minute)
  4. Relevance to conference theme
  5. Add your curriculum vitae or resume stressing the skills, background, or experience that qualifies you to present the topic you propose.

Complete proposal descriptions will assist reviewers’ evaluation of the appropriateness of the session or paper. In addition, selected submissions will be then compiled and for CE Approval, where each proposal will be evaluated individually for CE eligibility. To increase your chances of being approved for CE Units, please follow the proposal instructions as best and complete as you can.

Unfortunately, due to limited funds, no stipend is available this year.

Thank you for your interest and we hope to see you at this year’s EHI Conference!

Sincerely,
Nader Shabahangi and Mary G. Madrigal
Conference Chairpersons
EHI Board Members


Download the Call for Proposals [PDF].

View more info on 7th Annual EHI Conference on the EHI Upcoming Events page and sign up for free EHI Email Updates